1. nullmetal:

Ok I’m ready for class now

    nullmetal:

    Ok I’m ready for class now

     
  2. mamalaz:

    Avengers Actually Assembled

    A world where film studio rights don’t exist and all of Marvel exists as one place.

     
  3. 08:00

    Notes: 280531

    Reblogged from justjmo

    Tags: bunnybun

     
  4. i’ll tell you all how the story ends… where the good guys die & the bad guys win

     
  5. 08:00

    Notes: 3045

    Reblogged from gavinfreeappreciation

    Tags: RWBYperfect

    image: Download

    kumafromtaiwan:

Dancing~ ੭ु´ ᐜ `)੭ु⁾⁾

    kumafromtaiwan:

    Dancing~ ੭ु´ ᐜ `)੭ु⁾⁾

     
  6. 23:39 27th Aug 2014

    Notes: 80925

    Reblogged from musicisaportal

    Tags: heavy sigh

    timelady-of-221b:

    I FUCKING HATE SOCIAL ANXIETY BECAUSE YOU’RE SCARED TO TALK TO PEOPLE BUT ALSO DYING TO TALK TO PEOPLE AND HANG OUT AND RELAX AND HAVE FUN AND NOT BE ALONE AND LONELY AND FEEL LIKE SHIT BUT YOU DO FEEL LIKE SHIT BECAUSE YOU CAN’T EVEN RELAX ENOUGH TO TALK TO PEOPLE WITHOUT OVERTHINKING EVERYTHING

     
  7. 16:00

    Notes: 764

    Reblogged from frickgerard

    Tags: mcrmy chemical romancefrank iero

    
82/100 pictures of Frank for redheadweirdo

    82/100 pictures of Frank for redheadweirdo

     
  8. 08:00

    Notes: 2953

    Reblogged from frickgerard

    Tags: mcrmy chemical romancefrank iero

    image: Download

     
  9. 16:00 26th Aug 2014

    Notes: 2170

    Reblogged from frickgerard

    Tags: mcrmy chemical romance

    jaimesdimple:

    MCR Conventional Weapons - Side B’s

    (Side A’s)

     
  10. 08:00

    Notes: 58719

    Reblogged from doctor--cocktor

    Tags: fullmetal alchemistOH

    mustangst:

    Seven deadly sins / Seven heavenly virtues 
     
  11. 16:00 25th Aug 2014

    Notes: 60743

    Reblogged from nattysm56

    Tags: the fault in our starsoh nono

    xo-taradactyl:

    The Fault in Our Stars Soundtrack

    who else accidentally clicked on them? 

    (Source: lydeiamartin)

     
  12. 08:00

    Notes: 147954

    Reblogged from summersafarii

    Tags: anxietypanic attacksreferenceVERY GOOD

    image: Download

    perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

    perspicious:

    WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
        
    1. Stay with us and keep calm.
      The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

    2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
      You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

    3. Move us to a quiet place.
      We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

    4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
      We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

    5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

    6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

    7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
      As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                     
    WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

    1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
    We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

    Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

    Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


    2. Say, “Calm down.”
    This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

    Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

    Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


    3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
    Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

    Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


    4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
    Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

    The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

    Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


    CREDIT [X]  [X]

     
  13. 02:14

    Notes: 152589

    Reblogged from thetornadoofmymind

    Tags: evanPERFECTOMG

    dave-strider-dick-rider-413:

    quickweaves:

    THIS IS THE MOST POWERFUL VINE 

    I am tho and damn this dudes got a nice ass

    (Source: weloveshortvideos.com)

     
  14. 16:00 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 67383

    Reblogged from what-purnpkin

    Tags: The AvengersPERFECT

    lokiistrulydesperate:

    A masterpost of some of my favourite Avengers head canons, mainly starring Clint.

    (Credit to the bloggers that posted them)

     
  15. 08:00

    Notes: 171089

    Reblogged from nattysm56

    Tags: referencebrahahahahai'm a DD whyyyyyyy

    mr-egbutt:

    rikkisixx:

    keylimepie:

    wickedrandom:

    Bra Fitting 101. This changed my life

    Ladies of Tumblr, do yourself a huge favor and watch this video. Your lives will change for the better.

    i wore a B cup forever and was in a stripclub one night and got scolded by the dancers who said honey no you are a D. 

    went to lane bryant, got measured like the beginning of this video and was told I was DD almost DDD. 

    so now I wonder what I *ACTUALLY* am. 

    For those who don’t have the time or inclination to watch the full 1/4 hour video, here’s the succinct version:

    ONCE YOU HAVE THESE TWO MEASUREMENTS, find the difference. For argument’s sake, if the band measures 30” and the cup measures 36”, the difference is 6”. Then use the following chart to find your cup size:

    Congrats, now you have your bra size. A few tips about fit:

    • The band of the bra shouldn’t ride up your back. If it does, it’s too big.
    • Use the loosest hooks when you first start wearing it, so that when the elasticity starts to fail, you can tighten the band using the other hooks. Again, if the loosest hooks are too loose, go down a band size.
    • The cups and underwire should support your breasts, not squish them. If there’s any bulging going on anywhere around the cup, try going up a cup size.
    • The gore (the part of the bra that joins the cups) ABSOLUTELY MUST sit firmly against your sternum. If it doesn’t, then the cups are too small.

    SO that’s the cutdown, but you should still give the video a watch if you have time, she mentions lots of great places to shop and demonstrates the difference between well- and ill-fitted bras.